Course DescriptionsList of Course Descriptions

4130 Acutherapy

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Acutherapy is a light, gentle touch along with energetic principles and neuromuscular anatomy which, in a non-invasive way, helps reduce stress, promote pain relief, and aid injury rehabilitation. Acutherapy can be used in circumstances where many other modalities may be prohibited. Students will learn how to recognize stress/strain patterns and how to apply Acutherapy techniques to promote balance.

2105 Anatomy and Physiology

(3 Credits/60 Clock Hours)
In this class students will cover basic medical terminology, the organization of cells, tissues, and organs, and the structure and function of the body systems, with specific emphasis on interaction between the systems, and the muscular and skeletal systems.

2250 Applied Anatomy

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Applied Anatomy is a class that is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply their knowledge of basic anatomy and pathology to Massage Therapy by using “hands-on” lab experiences where palpation techniques of anatomical structures will link theory with experience. Co-requisite: Functional Anatomy.

5410 Aromatherapy

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class will introduce students to the history, production and uses of essential oils. Students will learn the physical, mental and emotional uses for oils and guidelines for blending oils for therapeutic use in bodywork.

6470 Auriculotherapy

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
A variation of acupuncture, auriculotherapy is the stimulation of the external ear for the assessment and treatment of health conditions in other parts of the body The stimulation is done by manual pressure, referred to as auricular acupressure (ear reflexology). These points on the ear can also be stimulated with lasers, magnets, and ear pellets. While auriculotherapy can effectively relieve pain, stress and tension when used alone, is often used in conjunction with many of the other methods of alternative medicine. Students are introduced to the layout of the ear and shown how to use the ear to help treat clients. The use of pellets is introduced.

3320 Business Practices

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Business Practices is designed to guide the professional Massage Therapist in real life business applications. The class begins with an assessment of each participant’s actual, existent and non-existent business materials and needs. Based upon each student’s personal assessment, they establish goals and course projects designed for creating, developing and implementing practical business management essentials for their respective practices. The subject matter for class lectures, coaching and discussions takes into consideration the components unique to the group and each individual’s focus. Prerequisite: Practice Building I and II.

1225 Chair/Trigger Point Massage

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class is designed to give the student a firm foundation in the use of a seated chair massage and a strong foundation in the treatment of trigger points. Forty percent of the class is devoted to learning techniques for chair massage using effective and correct body postures and logistics of the chair. The student will learn ways to introduce massage to those who have never had massage. The trigger point portion of the class will be based upon definitions and treatment of trigger points. Lectures will include physiological as well as mechanical indications for and treatment of trigger points. Prerequisite: Functional Anatomy.

6532 Clinical Lab

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This practice lab is designed to allow students the opportunity to apply multiple techniques in a clinical setting under the supervision of a LMT. Students are required to address and perform therapeutic massage for more than recreational purposes on actual clients. Prerequisite: Student Clinic III.

2330 Clinical Orthopedics

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This lab class will introduce fundamental orthopedic and neurologic tests as they apply to regional examination of the neuromusculoskeletal system and allows for opportunity for development and practice in the use of the tests. Additionally, material will be presented which relates to the development of the orthopedic and neurologic knowledge needed in a clinical setting. Material will also be presented which covers the common pathological conditions and/or disease processes associated with each region and their treatments. Prerequisite: Joint Pathology, Functional Anatomy.

5471 Cranial I

(2 Credits/40 Clock Hours)
This course covers the history and development of Cranio-Sacral Therapy and the value of this gentle modality in facilitating the improvement of numerous physical, mental, and emotional health problems. Students will learn about the body’s cranial-sacral mechanism, palpation of the cranial rhythm and learn to perform a basic Ten-step protocol. Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology.

6404 Cranial II

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course continues the study of Cranial-Sacral Therapy, adding to the student’s skill levels with additional evaluation techniques for locating hidden lesion patterns, and the introduction of BioDynamic Cranio-Sacral approaches to this therapy. Prerequisite: Cranial I.

5250 Crystal and Stone Awareness

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course introduces the student to the awareness that stones and crystals found on the earth have spiritual and psychic energies that can be tapped into for use in bodywork. The student is introduced to the physical properties of crystal and stones. History of their use, programming and conscientious choice of the stone is addressed.

5382 Deep Tissue Massage

(2 Credits/40 Clock Hours)
This class will teach the students the definitions, terms and techniques that will promote the balancing of the structural frame. Postural correction to the body through the use of correct body mechanics and proper deep tissue stroke will be taught. Discussion of how the body develops problems that affects the posture and homeostasis of the body. Tracking of the client progress from the work will also be shown. Prerequisite: Functional Anatomy, Swedish Massage.

6420 Emotional Release

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course presents a non-invasive, gentle technique of facilitating the release of emotional trauma from the tissues of the body without the emotional re-traumatization that can result with other approaches. Students will learn numerous approaches to this body-centered modality. Prerequisite: Cranial I.

5230 Energy Essentials I

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This is an advanced skill building class that draws from the most powerful healing modalities in our world today as well as the most recent information from quantum physics, philosophy, brain research and the new biology. Building on the work of leaders this class offers students advanced knowledge and enhanced awareness to exponentially strength their impact on their clients. Human beings hold their personal history, beliefs and experiences. These mental/emotional/ energetic patterns then translate into designs of physical, emotional, energetic problems and dis-ease with in the human body. Movement, touch, awareness and expanded perception are the cornerstones of healthy living and evolution. This class will teach the student to develop and enhance the functioning of their right brain and their intuitive abilities. The student will learn to expand and enhance their palpation skills, awareness and perception in order to assist their clients in the choice of well-being that they desire. The student will learn some of the vibrational designs of consciousness within the human body to increase understanding of how their clients have organized their body, mind and soul and the resulting well being or ill-being. The student will use this new learning and information in class with partners to apply their new skills. The student will learn to energetically increased freedom of choice, movement and evolution at the physical, mental, emotional and energetic levels for the well-being of their clients.

3130 Ethics

(0.3 Credit/6 Clock Hours)
This course is a foundational class dealing with the ethics of touch therapy. In it students will discuss issues dealing with dual relationships, professionalism in the work place, confidentiality, roles and boundaries of the massage therapist, prevention of sexual misconduct, and legal and ethical requirements of practicing massage. This course is graded by attendance. The student must be present for the entire course.

2220 Exercise Physiology

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Physiology concerns the functioning of the body’s structural machinery, that is, how the parts of the body work and carry out their life-sustaining activities. Exercise Physiology is the study of the ways cells and tissues of the body function during exercise, how the body functions at rest, and how the body responds and adapts to many different types of exercises. Prerequisite: Functional Anatomy.

1020 Externship

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Students will be placed in a clinic or office of a Chiropractor, Physical Therapist, Medical Doctor, Massage Therapist, Hospital, Veterinarian or other appropriate professional. Under the supervision of the professional, the student will be required to work in the office as if employed there. The goal of the program is to provide the student with the experience of working in an established clinical professional office. This experience will not only give the student the experience of working on actual clients in an actual office, but will also expose the student to all other aspects of running a professional office. Placing the students in this environment will give them the opportunity to improve their clinical skill and help them realize the other aspects of running a clinical practice such as insurance billing, overhead costs, marketing, determining location, etc. Prerequisite: LMT and Liability Insurance.

6003 Feldenkrais

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This modality focuses on integrating the body and mind through re-educating learned movements of the body through methodical and repetitious movement patterns.

3350 First Aid/CPR

0 Credits (Pass/Fail)
This is the Red Cross basic First Aid/CPR course for certification required of all Basic Core students prior to graduation. This is a non-credit class. Fee Required.

5490 Five Elements

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Five Elements expands the Yin/Yang theory to place all physical phenomena in the universe into one or more of five basic categories of natural correspondence; Water, Wood, Fire, Earth and Metal. Although Chinese in origin, this highly nuanced and effective approach to Oriental assessment and treatment has been developed to an exquisite level by modern Japanese and British practitioners. The Shen and Ko cycles will be discussed as well as the Five Element categories, their basic correspondences, their meridian corollaries, the transport points, and their importance in treatment situations. Prerequisite: Acupressure, Co-requisite: Shiatsu Lab.

2215 Functional Anatomy

(2 Credits/40 Clock Hours)
This class is an extension of the Anatomy and Physiology 2105 course. The emphasis will be on the bones, muscles, ligaments and nerves of the body as well as specific bony prominences, muscle attachments and kinesiology and some common injuries of the neuromusculoskeletal system. Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology.

5621 Herbology

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Herbology is the study of the healing qualities of plants and herbs. This class covers the history, theory and laws pertaining to natural healing through the use of various forms of plant life.

5440 Homeopathy

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Students will be taught the history, theory and laws of Homeopathy. Students will learn how remedies are made from natural origins, how they are used and what types are available. They will be taught basic concepts of homeotoxicology and how to use homeopathic medicines in practices.

1270 Hydrotherapy

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Students will be presented with opportunities for practicing various techniques designed at changing the environment of the body by means of water at varying temperatures and applied by manual, mechanical, and passive means. The use of water will be addressed in each of its three forms, solid, liquid, and gas and techniques taught to address treatments of clients. Some spa techniques such as body scrubs and wraps will be taught.

2150 Kinesiology

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class will be aimed at exploring the complexity of movement. The physiology of skeletal muscles will be reviewed. Lever systems will also be included in this course. Normal and abnormal gait patterns will also be covered. Prerequisite: Functional Anatomy.

1240 Lymphatic Drainage I

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
The course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of the lymphatic system and manual lymphatic drainage. An overview of the physiology of the lymphatic system, development of manual lymphatic drainage, as well as the benefits, effects and contraindications will be addressed. Students will learn basic hand strokes and a protocol for performing a lymphatic drainage session. Prerequisites: Functional Anatomy, Swedish Massage.

1241 Lymphatic Drainage II

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class builds upon the course work that began in Lymphatic Drainage I. Students will have sufficient opportunity to perfect the lymphatic stroke and will be trained further in more specific drainage of the body. Upon completion of the class, each student will be able to adequately work with normal lymphatic loads, understand in greater depth the physiology of the lymphatic system, the treatment of different edemas and the medical indications and contraindications for Lymphatic Drainage. Prerequisite: Lymphatic Drainage I.

1260 Medical Massage

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Medical Massage is designed to help students of massage therapy to identify the cause of chronic pain and dysfunction and to learn specific treatments protocols. Students will learn to incorporate treatment plans into the work with clients as well as to blend different modalities to affect change in their clients for the betterment of their health. The class begins the instruction in higher levels of learning to integrate into the medical field using massage. Students will learn postural and gait analysis as part of this course. Prerequisite: Functional Anatomy.

8100 Medical Terminology

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
The class is designed to give the student the ability to communicate with others in the medical field. Commonly used abbreviations and terms will be discussed and utilized in classroom exercises. Detailed charting of a client’s visit including subjective, objective, assessment plans are strongly utilized. Guidelines for communicating with others in the allied health community are introduced and practiced. Prerequisite: Anatomy & Physiology, Functional Anatomy, and Applied Anatomy, and Pathology I.

2400 Neurology I

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course will explore the anatomy and physiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Neuron physiology, neuronal pathways and nervous system pathology will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the effects of massage on the function of the nervous system. Prerequisite: Functional Anatomy.

2401 Neurology II

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class continues with the course work that began in Neurology I. Areas of specific focus that Neurology II will cover include the basal ganglia’s role in muscle control, the somatic motor system, cranial nerves, the brachial plexus and the lumbosacral plexus. Prerequisite: Neurology I.

3145/5466 Nutrition I & II

(1 Credit Each/20 Clock Hours Each)
These classes will give a general overview of nutrition and how different life styles affect health. Students will learn how the body digests and utilizes what it receives. Students will learn about free radicals and the immune system; vitamin and mineral supplementation and how enzymes and trace minerals contribute to well being. Students will learn about fiber, different types of proteins, grains, vegetables, juicing and food combining. Prerequisite: Nutrition I must be completed prior to taking Nutrition II.

4116 Oriental Meridians/Shiatsu I

(2 Credits/40 Clock Hours)
The class is designed to teach students basic Shiatsu tools and a Shiatsu table session flow through both demonstration and hands on practice. Students will also learn fundamentals of the 12 main meridians, and have an introduction to Qi and Yin/Yang Theory.

6007 Oriental Pathology

(2 Credits/40 Clock Hours)
This class will provide an opportunity for bodyworkers serious about Chinese medicine to familiarize themselves with the basic clinical concepts that underlie Chinese medical assessment. Qi and Blood, Vital Fluids, External Pathogenic Factors and Eight Principles will all be discussed. Prerequisite: Shiatsu II, Co-requisite: Shiatsu III.

2211 Pathology I

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
In this class students will cover basic terminology and definitions related to pathology, infectious agents and hygienic methods, the inflammatory process, and diseases and conditions of the skin, circulatory system, lymph, and immune systems. Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology.

2302 Pathology II

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
In this class students will cover diseases and conditions of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Special emphasis will be placed on arthritis and orthopedic injuries of the upper and lower extremities. Pathology II may be taken simultaneously with Pathology III. Prerequisite: Pathology I.

2306 Pathology III

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
In this class students will cover diseases and disorders of several body systems, including the respiratory, digestive, endocrine, urinary, and reproductive systems. Time will also be dedicated to discussing guidelines for massage in the context of cancer in general. Pathology III may be taken concurrently with Pathology II. Prerequisite: Pathology I.

8400 Pharmacology for Bodyworkers

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course is designed to give the student of massage therapy a basic understanding of the concepts and principles of pharmacology, its terms, the basic mechanisms by which drug classes act on the body, bring awareness to the administration of drugs, and help the massage therapist understand the implications of massage when clients are under the affects of drugs. The massage therapist will also gain an awareness of how drugs the client is taking may influence assessment results. Indications and contra-indications for each drug class will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Functional Anatomy, Pathology I. May be taken concurrently with Pathology II and Pathology III.

4320 Polarity I

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course presents the basic concepts and techniques of Polarity Therapy, a widely recognized modality of energy therapy. In addition to the historical background of this technique, students will learn about the chakras, energy fields, elements, and numerous protocols and their application.

6350 Positional Release

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course is an introduction to Positional Release, a gentle modality that effectively shows tissues how to release strain and tension patterns within 90 seconds, resulting in decreased pain and increased range of motion. From the first day, students will learn releases for the neck, shoulders, lower back, knees, and extremities. Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology.

3106 Practice Building I

(0.7 Credit/14 Clock Hours)
The focus of this course is the psychology of practice building; setting up a foundation geared towards business management concepts. The course includes goal setting, ethics, professionalism, success strategies, clinic and health code responsibilities, and Utah law.

3305 Practice Building II

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class further develops the essentials for developing and implementing a viable massage business. Students will learn how to identify and utilize resources, along with creating components for their own business plan. Classes include resume preparation, interviewing skills, creating advertising materials, developing marketing skills, and fundamental financial management – including budgeting, bookkeeping, taxes and insurance billing. Prerequisite: Practice Building I.

6025 Pre and Post Natal Massage

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class is designed to introduce the student to massage for women who are pregnant and who have just delivered. Specific bodywork techniques and body positioning using body cushions will be taught, massage demonstrated and practiced. Benefits, contraindications, and special considerations will also be taught. Course leaves the student with the ability to work with healthy women. Time permitting students may learn labor massage techniques. Prerequisites: Anatomy & Physiology and Swedish Massage

3185 Psycho-Somatic Principles

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class is designed to assist the therapist in understanding their role in the client/therapist relationship, how to evaluate or “read” a client’s emotional and physical stature to provide greater assessment, understand ethics in a “touch” profession as well as to understand one’s own behavior, all in an effort to understand their clients and how to serve them in a greater way. Prerequisite: Therapeutic Principles.

4120 Reflexology

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course covers the fundamentals of Zone Therapy and the effects of manipulating reflex areas of the feet for treatment of the entire body. Students will learn the benefits, effects and contraindications of Reflexology.

6000 Reiki

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Reiki is a Japanese form of healing. It incorporates elements of alternative healing practices such as energetic healing, auras, chakra balancing, and meditation. It involves the transfer of universal life source energy from practitioner to client in order to enhance the body’s natural ability to heal itself through the balancing of energy. It is a holistic, natural, hands-on energy healing system that effects all levels: body, mind, and spirit.

4402 Russian Massage

(2 Credits/40 Clock Hours)
This class explores and provides opportunity for practicing the art of Russian Massage. This class will present this very clinical technique which is used in Russian hospitals along side medical techniques aimed at rehabilitating and relieving patient symptoms. The technique itself involves much deep, kneading, specific massage. Prerequisite: Swedish Massage.

5431 Segmental Bodywork

(2 Credits/40 Clock Hours)
This class is designed to introduce students to various types of injuries, how they manifest, their symptoms, and rehabilitative massage techniques utilized in the treatment of these injuries. Students will be able to treat major muscles in segments and have a thorough hands-on knowledge of body planes and bony structures, identify precise locations of muscular attachments and bony landmarks. Prerequisites: Functional Anatomy.

6015 Shiatsu II

(2 Credits/40 Clock Hours)
This class is designed to take the beginning student from applying a basic Shiatsu session, to be able to begin individualizing their treatment for each client’s unique body patterns. Students will review the foundational Shiatsu I information, learn the meridian pathways in more detail, better understand Qi and how it works in the body, develop beginning assessment skills and learn the tools to treat kyo and jitsu imbalances for the purpose of restoring the harmony of Qi in the body. Prerequisite: Oriental Meridians/Shiatsu I.

5480 Shiatsu III

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class builds on the basic principles of Kyo/Jitsu assessment introduced in Shiatsu II. The effects of External Pathogenic Factors on the body will be explored using simple pulse, tongue, hara and meridian assessment techniques. Clinical presentations of deficiencies and blockages of Qi and Blood will be discussed, as will the use of Eight Principles assessment. Information gathered with these techniques will then guide the selection and application of appropriate Shiatsu techniques for hands-on work. Prerequisite: Shiatsu II, Co-requisite: Oriental Pathology.

6320 Shiatsu Lab

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
A lab designed to be combined with Shiatsu and Asian Bodywork related classes, providing students with guided hands on experience and practical application of learned principles. Co-requisite for Shiastu II, Acupressure, Five Elements Classes.

5510 Spa Techniques

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
With the growing demand for incorporation of spa techniques into massage, this course is designed to introduce the student to some common forms of spa treatments and the basic concepts of hydrotherapy. Some of the treatments that will be covered include salt glows, dry brushing, body scrubs, body wraps, foot soaks/scrubs, and the use of muds. Additional techniques will be covered as time permits. Prerequisite: Swedish Massage.

5335 Spinal Touch I

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Spinal Touch is a gentle, light touch therapy that relaxes postural muscles to promote corrections in distortion by focusing on the body’s natural center of gravity at the base of the spine. This class involves the study of the Stress/Strain syndromes and body mechanics of the body and utilizes a plumb line for postural analysis. The focus is to achieve postural balance and improved health. Prerequisites: Swedish Massage.

5405 Spinal Touch II

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This is the certification class that incorporates advanced techniques to become proficient at Spinal Touch Therapy. Students work on clients in a supervised setting to perform evaluations, apply technique and to adjust to anomalies encountered in practice. Advanced techniques include “dialing”, surrogate testing and muscle testing for paraplegics, invalids, infants and those unable to stand at a plumb line for evaluation. Prerequisite: Spinal Touch I.

4325 Sports Massage

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class will incorporate the concepts of massage for pre-event, post-event, rehabilitation and training in order to tailor a program to each individual athlete. Students will learn the basic muscular anatomy relating to athletes and their sport as well as an overview of the psychology of athletes. Students will learn to create a program for training and rehabilitation for each athlete. Students will learn pre and post-event massage as well as a number of deep tissue techniques. Prerequisites: Swedish Massage, Anatomy and Physiology, Functional Anatomy (Functional Anatomy may be taken concurrently).

5361 Sports Massage II

(2 Credits/40 Clock Hours)
This class is designed to further educate sports therapists both in theory and “hands-on” experience, preparing them for National Certification. Students will be taught stretching techniques, sports First Aid, and cryotherapy, how to deal with cramps and when to see a doctor. Prerequisite: Sports Massage I.

5341 Sports Pathology

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
With a sports massage focus, this class revolves around the concept of preventative work as well as injury management. This class specializes in medical concepts of stretching, taping as well as ice and heat as therapeutic treatments. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology, Functional Anatomy, Applied Anatomy (may be taken concurrently), Sports Massage I.

1001/1002/1003 Student Clinic I/II/III

(2 Credits Each/40 Clock Hours Each)
Under the direction of the clinic supervisor, students practice the Swedish massage techniques and other specialized modalities. Students have an opportunity to learn how to interface with clients & learn to create a professional atmosphere in their practices. Prerequisites: Swedish Massage & Swedish Massage Lab I (may be taken concurrently with Swedish Massage Lab I

3135 Survey of Bodywork

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class is designed to introduce some of the most effective and widely used modalities to assist the student in choosing future bodywork classes. An overview of many modalities is presented.

1101 Swedish Massage

(3 Credits/60 Clock Hours)
This class is the foundation bodywork course and sets the standard for the rest of the basic course. It focuses on the history, concepts, techniques, benefits and contraindications of traditional Swedish massage. It covers body mechanics, sanitation, hygiene, draping, setting up an environment, equipment, professionalism and attitudes necessary to provide a nurturing and productive bodywork session. Prerequisite: Anatomy & Physiology (may be taken concurrently)

1203/1204 Swedish Massage Lab I/II

(1 Credit Each/20 Clock Hours Each)
This lab is designed to provide supervised practice time for students to expand and perfect their Swedish techniques. Various therapists on staff may work with the students to expose them to different styles of massage and refined techniques. Prerequisites: Swedish Massage; students must complete Swedish Massage Lab I prior to Swedish Massage Lab II.

1103 Tai Chi I

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Tai Chi is an oriental form of exercise call the “Executive Martial Art”. Non-aerobic in nature but very much an exercise to promote health through movement. The student will learn the history, philosophy and exercise known as the “Yang Short form” along with the movement and use of Chi.

4500 Thai Massage

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course will present the history and technique of Thai Massage. Thai Massage blends styles from Asian neighbors passed down through the generations. The Thai method uses point pressure, muscle stretching and compression, done in a rhythmic movement of gentle rocking. In Thai massage it is not just the hands that are used to free tension from the recipient’s body, but the therapist’s feet, forearms, knees, and elbows as well. It is applied on a mat on the floor. The work is done fully clothed and no oils are required. Thai medical massage can move deeper into the mechanical functions of the body, working with deep muscle tension and joint mobility as well as nerve, muscle and ligament balancing.

4505 Thai Massage II (side lying)

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Thai Massage II continues where Thai Massage I leaves off. It is designed as an intermediate course. The student will learn a unique one and a half hour side-lying traditional Thai Massage sequence including review material from Thai Massage I. Prerequisite: Thai Massage I.

4510 Thai Massage for the Table

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
In this course the student will learn Thai massage for the table. Students will learn how to adapt techniques learned in previous levels as well as additional work specific to the table. There will be an emphasis on proper body mechanics, weight distribution, client and practitioner safety. As in traditional Thai massage, this technique is applied through clothing. Students will learn how to use their body to facilitate greater range of motion and joint mobility for their clients. Stretching is also an integral part of the technique of this work. Some seeking Thai massage may not be able to get to the floor or get up from the floor; therefore, this technique allows the practitioner to work with clients who have that limitation. Prerequisite: Thai Massage II.

3110 Therapeutic Principles

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course is designed to expose the student to the foundations of health and the causative factors behind illness and disease. The first half of this course explores the theories, concepts and science behind the healing process. Subjects include body mechanics, stress/strain syndrome, the triad of health (holistic health body/mind/spirit), and the physiology and psychology of pain. The second half will focus on concepts of social tendencies and how to understand personal tendencies. This will assist the therapist in understanding their role in the client/ therapist relationship.

6575 Therapeutic Touch (TT)

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class is a contemporary interpretation of several ancient-healing practices; it is an intentionally directed process of energy exchange during which practitioners use the hands to facilitate healing. In TT, the human being is viewed as a complex, dynamic whole and healing is seen as the means of restoring integrity of body, mind, emotions and spirit. This class examines the history, definition, applications, research and other important information about TT. The student will learn centering, gain a better understanding on how to intentionally direct and redirect energy, as well as practice energetic re-balancing of his/her own and others’ energy fields as they relate to health and bodywork. Supervised clinical experience in this program enables one to take away a basic knowledge and practical applications of TT. This class is a first step in becoming credentialed as a Qualified Practitioner of Therapeutic Touch (QTTP) by NH-PAI, the official organization of Therapeutic Touchä.

4315 Touch for Health I

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Students will learn a system of applied kinesiology to help discover imbalances in energy flows of the acupuncture meridians in the body. Muscles can become weakened and cause the body to move out of balance. Students will learn to locate blockages and use correction techniques to balance the body energies.

5435 Touch for Health II

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Building on the muscles and correction techniques studied in Touch for Health I, this course introduces fourteen additional muscles used in balancing the body’s energy system. Additional muscle correction, trauma release, and energy balancing techniques will also be studied. Learn the concepts of Over and Under meridian energy within the Chinese Five Element Meridian Theory and use one point balancing for optimal body/mind health and happiness. Prerequisite: Touch for Health I.

5310 Tuina Musculoskeletal

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
Tuina is a “push-pull” traditional Chinese massage technique. Students will learn how to use specific acupressure points along the energy meridians to relieve various symptoms. Students will learn the specific routines for working each area and integrated system of the body. Prerequisite: OM/Shiatsu I (may be taken concurrently).

5445 Tuina Systemic

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course is a more in depth look at the organ systems of the body including digestion, circulatory, respiratory as it relates to pathological conditions. Students will learn specific sequences used to balance the organ systems of the body. Prerequisite: OM/Shiatsu I (may be taken concurrently).

5476 Upper Body Myofascial Techniques

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This course is designed to introduce the student to fascia and the concepts of stretching fascia in order to facilitate greater heath, range of motion, and functionality in the body. Students will learn the anatomy and physiology of fascia including some of the newest research in the area of fascia, conceptual models of how fascia is moved, techniques to release the fascia in the upper body, and will learn advanced techniques to treat headaches, TMJ dysfunction, adhesive Capsulitis, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Prerequisite/co-requisite Functional Anatomy.

3400 Utah Laws, Rules, and Ethics

0 Credits (Pass/Fail)
The Utah Laws, Rules, and Ethics course is designed to teach the student about the regulations pertaining to massage in Utah and who is first becoming licensed in Utah. The student will be given a current set of the laws, the rules, and the ethical code of conduct as adopted by the State of Utah. Items of interest will include scope of practice, makeup of the Board of Massage, discipline, laws and rules concerning apprentices, educational and testing requirements, unprofessional and unlawful conduct, professionalism, confidentiality, roles and boundaries, and sexual misconduct. This class is required if the student is pursuing a license in Utah. It helps prepare them to take the Utah Laws and Rules exam necessary for licensing. The class is four clock hours in length.

6005 Yoga

(1 Credit/20 Clock Hours)
This class will explore the ancient art and practice of Yoga. Developed in India, Yoga is a psycho-physical discipline with roots going back about 5,000 years. Today, most Yoga practices in the West focus on the physical postures called “asanas,” breathing exercises called “pranayama,” and meditation. The word “Yoga” means union. Traditionally, the goal of Yoga is union with the Absolute, known as Brahman, or with Atman, the true self. This class will focus on the more down-to-earth benefits of Yoga, including improved physical fitness, mental clarity, greater self-understanding, stress control and general well-being. Spirituality, however, is a strong underlying theme to most practices. The beauty of Yoga is in its versatility, allowing practitioners to focus on the physical, psychological or spiritual, or a combination of all three.